About the TypeCon2011 Program

TypeCon2011 surges into the Big Easy. Dozens of the brightest names in type and design will share their knowledge and skills, exploring topics such as: Japanese typography; the champions of readability; typography for the web; the graphic history behind QSL cards; book design and bookbinding; Fontographer basics; letterpress techniques; connections between lettering and lingerie; historic New Orleans print engraving; the lack of Latin typographic heritage in Turkey; glass gliding; and so much more.

Special events include the sixth annual Type & Design Education Forum, the tenth anniversary edition of the always entertaining Type Crit, plus the international TypeGallery2011 exhibition. Workshops, presentations, panel discussions, networking events, tours, and social gatherings will form a typographic adventure that will inspire you for years to come!

The TypeCon problem is also available in a mobile optimized version. Head over to m.typecon.com and connect up your Twitter account. Once you’re signed in, browse the daily schedule, “star” the sessions you’re interested in attending, and then view or subscribe to your personal schedule.

This information is subject to change.

Tuesday, July 5th

5:00pm – 8:00pm

Wednesday, July 6th

9:00am – 4:30pm

7:30pm – 10:00pm

Thursday, July 7th

9:00am – 6:00pm

9:00am – 4:30pm

6:30pm – 9:00pm

Friday, July 8th

Main Program

8:00am

  • Continental Breakfast

8:30am

  • Exhibits & Marketplace Open

8:30am

  • Opening Remarks

8:40am

  • Analog Dialog / Painting signs in New Orleans
    — Yvette Rutledge, Mystic Blue Signs
    When the digital revolution overtook the sign industry, a few sign artists continued to draw, paint, and produce everything by hand. Mystic Blue Signs is one of those companies, and New Orleans is a particularly receptive community, with cultural and architectural traditions that embrace a synthesis of past and present. This presentation is a slide show of our work in New Orleans, from logo design and sign writing to hand-carving and classic gold leaf work, with descriptions of how the flexibility of hand-lettering allows us to reflect the character of our city while maneuvering effectively in challenging design circumstances.

9:25am

  • Tactility and Typographic Space; Type as Material Form
    — Will Hill, Anglia Polytechnic University
    The paper considers the significance of touch and dimensionality in our engagement with type. The paper explores the material and tactile dimensions of typography, considering the manner in which the processes of manual punchcutting have informed the historical development of typographic forms, the development of letters in architectural and environmental contexts, and the current revival of interest in letterpress. These concerns are linked by tactile values absent from current digital working methods. The paper will conclude with a consideration of letterpress in design education and the use of metal type as an instrument of haptic learning.

10:05am

10:30am

  • Type in 20:
    Eccentric Characters: Engraved Print Notations from The Historic New Orleans Collection

    — Nancy Sharon Collins, Southeastern Louisiana University
    The Historic New Orleans Collection in the historic French Quarter contains Louisiana, and New Orleans, artifacts and ephemera, much print—some quirky tidbits—and stuff created specifically for the local market. In the early days, this important port town attracted engravers from France, seeking a better life in the New World. These artist/tradespersons cut characters into metal, that were then printed in types of all kinds, as well as musical scores, Mardi Gras wonders, and etc. This Type in 20 presentation would provide a highly visual look at marvelous typographic engraved specimens from this very special, Crescent City, collection.

10:50am

  • Type in 20:
    Typography of the “Generation Y”, prior to “Generation Z”!

    — Mehmet Gozetlik
    Today; we live in a new world where in Facebook, Twitter, global warming and Google exist. We check and read our e-mails with iPhones, read newspapers from iPads and establish communication with wireless networks. Our environment, living conditions have changed and change rapidly in progress. This digital evolution is experienced by Generation Y, whose lives are interlined 15 hours per day with media and communication technologies. Generation Y; who carry out vast amount of their productions in the field of information technology and choose internet as communication platform, is planning whole of their lives on mobile devices. So; Can the old formulas fulfill the needs of that new era? What are unique plastic values of that new era in which majority of the communications performed with digital media? Do Generation Y; who are trained by Generation X, ready to educate Generation Z? What are changing in the field of communication before Generation Z, who is formed by the most linked individuals on the earth? Even though The new generations’ technologies are not yet invented, how is met the needs of their lives? This presentation can provide us clues about the new typography perspective that we need.

11:10am

  • Type in 20:
    Elegy, A New Typeface Design and How It Came About

    — Jim Wasco, Monotype
    Jim Wasco will discuss his award winning new typeface design, Elegy, and how it came about. Elegy is based on the ITC logo designed by Ed Benguiat ~1970. Jim will discuss his influences and background in lettering Spencerian Script. He will show some historic examples used as references for the design, and then show how Elegy was created, including the sophisticated OpenType features put into the font that make Elegy function like real handwriting.

11:35am

  • The Great Readability Scandal
    — William Berkson
    In the late 1930s, a scientist was the first to distinguish readability from legibility, and to develop measures for readability. A vicious quarrel broke out over the validity of this research. This now-forgotten quarrel had a profound impact on those working with type. Among typographers, the distinction between readability and legibility became common. But among scientists, the distinction was dropped and its absence put up a roadblock hindering research. Now, recent research shows that the original scientist was right all along. This new evidence has important implications for both typographers and reading researchers.

12:15pm

  • Lunch Break

2:00pm

  • Best Practices for Producing Web Fonts
    — Bill Davis, Monotype
    Until recently Type designers have focused their attention on producing fonts for print. Web fonts represent a new frontier for type designers and font developers, but creating Web fonts has an entirely different set of requirements. This talk will cover key issues that type designers need to understand to create Web fonts that can be deployed with CSS @font-face. This includes screen legibility, hinting for Windows, metrics, font family naming, font formats and QA procedures. The goal of the session is to provide type designers with practical insights to be able to better prepare fonts that are Web font ready.

2:50pm

  • Type in 20:
    Explorations in Typography

    — Carolina de Bartolo, Academy of Art University
    Explorations in Typography: Mastering the Art of Fine Typesetting is a new visual textbook for intermediate to advanced typography by Carolina de Bartolo with Erik Spiekermann. In this presentation Carolina will explain her unique approach to teaching typography through her exercises called “Explorations.” She’ll talk about the process of creating the book and its innovative interactive companion website. Please visit her site for further information about this project.

3:10pm

  • Type in 20:
    Artifacts All Around: Typographic Curiosities at the Cary Collection

    — Amelia Hugill-Fontanel, RIT
    Plaster casts of body parts — Miniature presses fit for a doll’s house — Relics in brass and steel: carefully carved, punched, or molded — Animal skin rendered into the finest substrate — Are these unlikely holdings for a library or integral pieces in our typographic heritage? Catch a glimpse of some unique artifacts from the RIT Cary Graphic Arts Collection and hear the fascinating tales of how these items came to reside in a library which holds some 30,000 volumes dedicated to the history of printing, books arts, graphic design, and typography.

3:30pm

3:50pm

  • Typography of the Cherokee Language Through History: The Positive Effects of Orthography
    — Joseph Erb & Roy Boney, Cherokee Nation
    This presentation will discuss the efforts undertaken by the Cherokee community to address the problems and achievements of orthography. It will cover the adoption of the Cherokee syllabary into the Unicode system, the usage of the Cherokee syllabary in modern computing systems, the mobility of the Cherokee language in various hardware platforms and social web presences, and the adoption of Cherokee language technology by the Cherokee community.

4:35pm

  • Catalyst Award Presentation
    The Society of Typographic Aficionados (SOTA) will present Erin McLaughlin with the 2011 SOTA Catalyst Award for her achievements and future promise in the field of typography. Erin will provide a presentation of her work.

5:25pm

  • Dinner Break

Evening Events

5:30pm – 6:30pm

6:30pm – 8:00pm

Saturday, July 9th

Main Program

8:00am

  • Continental Breakfast

8:30am

  • Exhibits & Marketplace Open

8:30am

  • Opening Remarks

8:40am

  • A Paradox in Black and White
    — Akira Kobayashi, Linotype
    Mr. Kobayashi has spent several years working with Hermann Zapf and Adrian Frutiger. The collaborative projects with type giants have produced fine-tuned classics such as Optima nova, Palatino nova, Avenir Next and Neue Frutiger, and some brand new designs such as Palatino Sans. In 2009 Akira Kobayashi started a new Sans Serif family designed from scratch. His goal was a unique typeface family inspired by both industrial type designs such as DIN and types with organic curves such as Cooper Black. The resulted type has an unusual ‘soft-focus’ effect. In his presentation Akira Kobayashi shows its details.

9:25am

  • From Wood Type to Webtype: What Letters Made of Wood and Metal Can Teach Us About Letters Made of Pixels
    — Nick Sherman, Font Bureau
    Now that the age of webfonts is upon us, there are many exciting new possibilities for typographers and typeface designers. But, as with other typographic revolutions throughout history, many fundamental principles remain relevant to the design and use of type, whether it involves ink and paper or hinting and sub-pixels. By looking back at the history of the craft, this presentation will explore what can be learned about type in the present day, and what might happen with its future on the web and beyond.

10:05am

10:30am

  • Type in 20:
    New Problems of Book Design

    — John Berry
    What does it mean to design a book, at a time when books take multiple forms – not just hardcover and paperback, but Kindle, iBook, print-on-demand, and formats you can download interchangeably to your laptop, your tablet, and your phone? Book covers are viewed more often as thumbnail images onscreen than they are on physical books. Interiors may be quickly printed on bad paper and bound too tight, or viewed on a screen that could be any size, resolution, or aspect ratio. How do you design a book today for sale and for reading?

10:50am

  • Type in 20:
    Where the Rubber Meets the Road: Where are Designers Going with Web Fonts?

    — Scott Boms, Brian Warren & Luke Dorny
    Real web fonts are changing how designers and developers build modern, accessible, standards-based web sites, long-lasting electronic publications, and mobile applications. Increased cooperation from type designers and foundries throughout the last two years has begun to bridge a critically important issue that affects designers, developers, and end-users. While web fonts are an important piece in the puzzle and help reduce the need for bloated code, hacks, and workarounds; they introduce new challenges and invite additional questions — further complicated by new platforms, devices and technologies. By examining how the use of type and the needs of web designers have evolved on the web, this brief talk will take a peek behind the looking glass at challenges and opportunities in the increasingly complicated worlds of modern web, publishing and mobile design as they relate to web fonts and typographic control.

11:10am

  • Type in 20:
    Making Graphic Design Easier: Improving the Way We Measure Type

    — Ricardo Martins
    Designers need to decide which size is more appropriate for the text. However, the reference measure used for over 100 years is the “body size”, which was useful for lead type. Today, the metal has been replaced by digital font and body size no longer makes sense, since it measures the invisible. The objective of this presentation is to propose a new typographic measure, implementable in graphic softwares and digital fonts, helping the designer to choose the correct type size based on how the eye sees the strokes of letters, namely Contrast Sensitivity Function (CSF).

11:35am

  • PSE QSL TNX BCNU 73s & 88s: The Design History of QSL Cards 1920–1980
    — Kenneth Jones, Harford Community College
    Ham radio operators from the 1920s through 1980s—mostly untrained in art or design— created original, visual identities for themselves with custom made and printed QSL cards. These cards, a folk art in their own right, represented the radio operator’s individual spirit and psyche through typography and graphic design. Home-spun designs celebrated a unique and vernacular system of symbols and codes that described personal information such as: family, place and community and paired it with specific transmission measures and jargon of fugitive airwave signals—time, frequencies and wattage exclusive to the special long-distance communication between two strangers in unmapped space.

12:15pm

  • Lunch Break

2:00pm

  • Japanese Typography from あ to Z
    — Ian Lynam, Temple University, Japan
    No real attempt has been made as of yet, however, at providing Western designers with an in depth understanding of Japanese typography. Yet from the 1990s through today, we regularly see Japanese dotting the Western typographic landscape. This presentation will be a quick, though comprehensive look at the visual language of Japan from a perspective of holistic understanding that synthesizes history, development, meaning, and style in equal proportions. If we as designers understand more about a language, we’ll be able to approach it with a more informed opinion and convey the nuances appropriate to proper communication in lieu of mere surface application of style.

2:50pm

  • Type in 20:
    Protect your Fonts and Help your Users with EPAR

    — Ted Harrison, FontLab
    Type design is an undervalued craft because most people do not understand that the type they are using is software which is licensed in the same way that other software is. In order to increase user awareness of the terms of font EULAs the EPAR (Embedding Permissions and Recommendations) table for OpenType fonts was developed and an editor created for it. This presentation will demonstrate the use of the online EPAR editor and the EPAR editor in Fontographer 5.1 for adding license information to a font.

3:10pm

  • Type in 20:
    Basic DNA Notation System and Fonts

    — Anthony Rozak & David Rozak, SUNY Buffalo
    Ambiscript is a functional notation that was designed to reflect natural symmetries in the DNA double helix. The symmetries embodied in the font facilitate the manipulation and analysis of textually represented genetic code. Ambiscript characters were also constructed so that they could be combined to represent populational variations in individual genes. We have recently refined the notation so that genetic uncertainty, or entropy, can be visually conveyed by the diffusion of colors across the compound symbols. This arrangement draws the eye to regions of highly conserved code, making it easy for researchers to find biological significance in a sea of genetic text.

3:30pm

3:50pm

  • Panel Discussion: “Critics Critique Critics”
    — Matthew Carter, John Downer & Akira Kobayashi
    Matthew Carter, John Downer, and Akira Kobayashi, who lead the annual Type Crit at TypeCon, have agreed to “a temporary reversal of roles” and will be offering an entertaining and insightful joust in order for audience members to witness what happens when the gloves come off. The three will take pokes at work done by each of the other two critics. Imagine it as part roast and part paean. No friendships are expected to be harmed or sacrificed during the course of the remarks.
     

    A ten-minute introduction will include remarks from all three panelists. Each will speak very briefly about the body of work done by the other two. John will moderate. Then, each panelist will address just one published typeface or family. Five minutes will be allocated per subject, plus three minutes of rebuttal. Slides will be shown and printed handouts will be provided. To conclude, a Q & A session will run as long as time permits.

4:50pm

  • SOTA Typography Award Presentation

Evening Events

5:00pm – 8:00pm

8:30pm – 10:30pm

Sunday, July 10th

Main Program

8:45am

  • Continental Breakfast

9:15am

  • Exhibits & Marketplace Open

9:15am

  • Opening Remarks

9:25am

  • CSS 3 Web Typography: More Than Web Fonts
    — Thomas Phinney, Extensis
    Web typography is changing dramatically thanks to browser support for @font-face and server-based fonts. Web designers now have thousands of font choices where they once had just a dozen. But beyond @font-face, CSS 3 introduces myriad new typographic controls, dramatically reducing the typography gap between web and print. Phinney shows both font-independent and OpenType-dependent features, including these features in action on web pages, from everyday workhorse typography to the strange and silly. He also covers other CSS 3 typographic features such as kerning and hyphenation, the current state and near future of advanced typography support in browsers, and issues around font rendering.

10:05am

10:30am

  • Type in 20:
    Lettering and Lingerie

    — Neil Summerour, Positype
    When you think of Victoria’s Secret, the concept of typography is oft ignored in lieu of scantily clad Brazilian models. But a recent set of projects I took on, changed my perception of how this company is using hand lettering and custom type design to better communicate and draw their clientele into their demure and provocative narrative. This quick talk will detail concept, process and development of the VS Flirt typeface, PINK Lovable typeface, and custom lettering associated with the 2010 limited edition Little Book of Sexy — which, incidentally, had me knee deep in cosmetic counters finding just the right shade of lipstick (seriously).

10:50am

  • Type in 20:
    The Klingspor-Museum in Offenbach: A Treasure and Great Resource for Type Designers and Teachers

    — Otmar Hoefer
    The Klingspor-Museum in Offenbach am Main has the collection of famous type designers like Rudolf Koch, Otto Eckmann, Peter Behrens and many others. The visitors are invited to study each original at hand. In addition The Museum has a large collection of rare books about typography and collects artists books. I am the webmaster of the Museum for the last 10 years and together with my colleague Hans Reichardt, we have now over 3,000 PDFs of many international type designers online. This is a great resource for research and education in graphic arts schools.

11:10am

  • Type in 20:
    Chasing Words

    — Grahame Lynch, Ryerson University
    Low vision defines much of my everyday experience and has influenced the way I communicate as an artist, designer and educator. In this discussion of my recent art installations I address the relationship of vision and haptic experiences in the formation of memory, prosthetic devices and inclusive design. The work references a love of reading, and that the ability to read is the first thing I notice slipping when my vision changes. The work is intended to heighten the viewer’s awareness and give cause to re-evaluate what can and cannot be seen and to question the potential for loss.

11:35am

  • The Lack of Latin Typographic Heritage and Type Design in Turkey
    — Onur Yazıcıgil, Sabancı University, Istanbul
    Spoken language and written script are two defining characteristics that a nation will use in order to unify its members and to culturally distinguish itself. The region now comprised of the Republic of Turkey, once using the Arabic alphabet, made a radical, and often deemed “overnight” change to the Latin alphabet. This was a revolutionary decision that affected the course of typography in the country. This paper investigates the typographic paradigm shift that occurred in Turkey, which has resulted in the phenomenon of a “lack of typographic heritage,” and further explores the significance of type design in the region.

12:15pm

  • Lunch Break

12:45pm

2:00pm

  • Ligatures to Lichen: A Gathering of Incised Letterforms (circa 1640–1750)
    — Lynne Baggett, Louisiana State University
    Among publications on the subject of gravestone research, importance is typically placed on the epitaph or decorative motif, with scant attention directed specifically toward characteristics of the form of the incised lettering itself. Careful observation by experts in the field of typography and letterform design has the potential to reveal much about the stonemason’s heritage, influences and independent creative voice. For the past year, Baggett has been developing a method to disseminate her research to a broader public audience and focus her attention more specifically on the idiosyncrasies found within incised lettering created by the early stonemason of the American Colonies.

2:50pm

  • Typographic Matchmaking
    — Veronika Burian & José Scaglione, TypeTogether
    When starting a new project, one of the many tasks a designer encounters, is the selection of typefaces. Recognising the combined effect of typefaces is crucial. In this context, some of the important questions are: what typographic style transmits the message best, what typefaces work well together for the particular task, what character-set and how many weights are needed, and finally, what functions are the typefaces expected to perform. This presentation deals with such fundamental issues and offers guidance on how to approach the delicate matter of love and hate relationships that often exist between typefaces. The discussion is illustrated with examples of “typographic couples”, both good and bad.

3:35pm

  • Type in 20:
    Type Design and the Fourth Dimension

    — Tore Terrasi, University of Texas
    Why do we limit ourselves to using letterforms designed for two-dimensional media when our message is more and more frequently delivered in the 4th dimension? By using the 4th dimension of time we expand the communicative possibilities of typographic voice and bring the visual representation of language closer to its origins, speech. On the page, well designed static letterforms yield themselves to a specific typographic voice, designed to set the mood and impact the message of the text it supports. This session will look at devices and practices being used to expand letterform design out from flat-land into dynamic-land.

3:55pm

  • Type in 20:
    Font Aid: Past, Present, and Future

    — Michelle Perham & Grant Hutchinson, SOTA
    This past spring, Font Aid V was launched to raise money for earthquake and tsunami victims in Japan. As with past Font Aid projects, the response from the design community was tremendous. The project was truly rewarding and inspiring with contributions from hundreds of designers around the world. I’d like share a brief history of Font Aid and the amazing work that has been contributed. The SOTA board has talked about different ideas for the direction they’d like to see Font Aid headed in the future and I’d like to invite the audience to share their thoughts and ideas.

4:15pm

  • Closing Remarks

Evening Events

6:00pm – 9:00pm